You are reading

Queens Lawmakers Introduce Bill That Would Double Fines for Loud Vehicles

A red sports car spitting flames from an exhaust (Photo: Oscar Sutton via Unsplash)

May 10, 2022 By Michael Dorgan

More than a dozen councilmembers– including three from Queens–have introduced legislation that would ramp up fines for drivers of noisy vehicles.

The bill—sponsored by 17 councilmembers including Queens representatives Sandra Ung, Linda Lee and Lynn C. Schulman—would double the existing penalties for motorists who drive with loud exhausts or excessively honk their horns. Fines for drivers using illegal sound devices on their vehicles would also be increased two-fold.

The legislation aims to tackle noise pollution by targeting disorderly drivers generating ear-splitting sounds. Minimum fines would start at $300 and climb as high as $6,000 for repeat offenders.

Ung, who represents District 20 in Flushing, said that hiking the fines would send a message that unruly behavior by motorists will not be tolerated.

“Drivers who make illegal and excessively loud retrofits to their vehicles and then speed through our communities late at night have no business on our streets,” Ung said.

“Excessive noise isn’t just a quality-of-life nuisance, it also causes serious health issues due to stress and loss of sleep, as well as negatively impacts our children.”

Queens councilmembers Sandra Ung and Linda Lee

Queens councilmembers Sandra Ung (L) and Linda Lee (R) have co-introduced legislation that would increase fines for drivers of noisy vehicles. (Photos: NYC Council and Lee for NYC Council)

The lawmakers, citing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, said that excessive noise can cause countless other adverse health effects including high blood pressure, speech interference and hearing loss.

Under the legislation, drivers whose exhausts or mufflers can be heard more than 150 feet away would be hit with a civil penalty of up to $1,050 for a first offense – up from $525 — increasing to as much as $3,150 for a third violation.

Drivers who honk their horns for reasons other than an emergency will also be targeted with a fine of up to $2,000 for a first offense – up from $1,000 — to a maximum of $6,000 for a third violation.

Lastly, drivers using air horns installed on a vehicle could be hit with fines up to $3,950 for multiple violations.

The lawmakers say that their legislation complements the 2021 passage of the New York State SLEEP Act, which raised the penalties for auto shops that perform any illegal modifications of mufflers and exhaust systems that allow cars and motorcycles to become noisier.

Lee said that these laws seek to bring some peace and quiet back to neighborhoods.

“Excessive and obnoxious vehicle noise is the bane of families’ existence across Eastern Queens,” said Lee, who represents District 23.

“These vehicles and their drivers are causing real harm to our environment, health, and overall quality of life.”

email the author: news@queenspost.com
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Priest imposter who allegedly robbed Queens church arrested in California after nationwide hunt

A bald-headed burglar who allegedly posed as a priest to gain entry to the rectory at American Martyrs Roman Catholic Church in Oakland Gardens—before robbing a real reverend of $900—was arrested in California earlier this month.

Malin Rostas, 45, of New York, was arrested by deputies from the Moreno Valley Sheriff’s Station, which is part of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office, on an outstanding burglary warrant out of Pennsylvania. Rostas, believed to be a serial thief, was wanted by jurisdictions across the nation.

Crunching the Queens crime numbers: grand larcenies down across borough, rapes halved in the north, robberies decrease in the south

Apr. 17, 2024 By Ethan Marshall

The number of grand larcenies across Queens was down during the 28-day period from March 18 to April 14, compared to the same period of time last year, according to the latest crime stats released by the NYPD Monday. At the same time, rapes and robberies decreased significantly in northern and southern Queens, respectively.