You are reading

Parks Dept. to Begin Revamp of Bowne Park Pond in Flushing

NYC Parks Dept. will begin construction work on a $1.45 million renovation project at Bowne Park in Flushing this week (Google Maps)

March 22, 2021 By Michael Dorgan

The NYC Parks Dept. will begin construction on a $1.45 million renovation project at Bowne Park in Flushing this week.

The pond area of the park, which is located on the border of Flushing and Broadway-Flushing, will undergo a major overhaul that will include an upgrade of the water fountains, the installation of new water cannons and the replacement of the granite stone wall at the edge of the pond.

The pond area, which is situated in the western section of the 11.8 acre park, has become a hotbed for garbage, red algae and dead wildlife, officials said.

Bowne Park (Google Maps)

The revamp is expected to be completed by August 2022, according to Council Member Paul Vallone who secured funding for the entire project.

Vallone, whose district covers the park, said the latest upgrades will help return the pond area back to its former glory.

“The renovations to our iconic pond will add to the serene beauty that is unique to this park,” Vallone said in a statement Friday.

The pond upgrades come nearly four years after the playground section of the park was overhauled.

 

A rendering for the renovation work set to be carried out at Bowne Park (NYC Parks)

The revamp of the pond will include upgrading the water fountains and filtration system while sediment at the bottom of the pond will be removed, according to Vallone.

A connection to a well will be repaired so that groundwater will refill the pond instead of city water which is currently being used.

A new aeration system, that helps break down wastewater, will be installed to help to improve the water quality of the pond. It will consist of three water cannons.

Catch basins and storm sewer lines that empty into the pond will also be cleared.

Additionally, granite stone on the wall at the edge of the pond is set to be replaced while portions of the existing asphalt path system will be reconstructed and new plantings will also be put down.

The renovations will take place in phases so that the pond’s wildlife will not be affected, Vallone said.

NYC Parks Queens Borough Commissioner Michael Dockett said that that park is used by residents all year-round. He said the new filtration system, in particular, will help restore the park’s natural splendor.

“[It] will provide a healthy habitat for wildlife and revitalize the park’s natural ecosystem,” Dockett said.

A water fountain at the park. (Photo: NYC Parks)

email the author: news@queenspost.com
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Urgent manhunt underway for ‘animal’ who allegedly raped a 13-year-old girl in Flushing park on Thursday: NYPD

The NYPD announced a $10,000 reward is being offered for information that leads to the arrest of a Hispanic man who allegedly raped a 13-year-old girl in a wooded area of Kissena Corridor Park on Thursday afternoon.

More than sixty investigators were at the crime scene late into the night. During a press briefing by NYPD brass on Friday, Chief of Department Jeffrey Maddrey said that the manhunt was expanded city-wide and that the department would spare no expense until the suspect was apprehended.

Op-ed: Congestion pricing would do much more harm than good for New Yorkers

Jun. 11, 2024 By Assemblymember David I. Weprin

Like many residents throughout the five boroughs and across the New York Metro Area, I was pleasantly surprised by Governor Kathy Hochul’s decision to “indefinitely pause” the implementation of Congestion Pricing. Rather than seeing this as a cynical calculation, as some have alleged, I see the Governor’s decision as a deeply pragmatic response to the crescendo of public concerns that I and many others have raised for years. As the countdown to the June 30 implementation date neared, everyday New Yorkers did what we do best: we spoke up for ourselves and said we won’t accept a bad deal! I applaud Governor Hochul for having the courage not just to listen to us but to take a tough stand against this misguided policy.