You are reading

Council Member Ung Calls for Better Signage Along Main Street Busway in Flushing

Council Member Sandra Ung is calling on the DOT to improve signage along the Flushing Main Street Busway (DOT via Twitter)

March 15, 2022 By Allie Griffin

Council Member Sandra Ung is calling on the Department of Transportation to improve signage along a busway in Flushing where she says motorists are unknowingly driving in the bus-only lanes and getting smacked with fines.

Ung sent a letter to DOT Commissioner Ydanis Rodriguez last week urging the department to install larger, more visible signs to alert drivers that they will be fined if the travel along the Main Street Busway.

The busway, which was designed to speed up bus service, was established at the beginning of 2021 and covers a 0.6 mile stretch of Main Street – from Northern Boulevard to Sanford Avenue.

“While the drivers were violating traffic laws, many are doing so unintentionally because they are unaware of the busway’s existence,” Ung wrote in the March 9 letter. “I feel more can be done by the Department of Transportation (DOT) to ensure that drivers are aware of the changes, and that summonses are never issued in the first place.”

Only buses, trucks and emergency vehicles are permitted on the busway as through-traffic. The DOT prohibits all other motorists from using it, unless it is for local street access, pick-up and drop-offs, or garage access—and the operator of the vehicle makes the next available right turn off it.

The DOT began fining busway violators in early April after a 60-day grace period when the new busway first opened. A single-vehicle violation costs $50 — with fines increasing to as much as $250 for a fifth offense. Violators are caught by a camera and mailed the summons.

Ung said despite the grace period, many drivers are still unaware they’re breaking the law by driving along the busway.

She said that several residents have reached out to her office to report that they have received summonses for failing to turn off Main Street at 37th Avenue, specifically.

Ung said the signage ahead of the intersection is easy to miss and unclear. The two signs alerting drivers that they must turn off the street are “simple white signs and do not stand out in the streetscape” and are “relatively small,” she said.

“Given the congested nature of Downtown Flushing, it is easy to see how a distracted driver could overlook the signs,” Ung wrote in the letter. “Outside of those two signs, there are no other markings delineating the Busway is about to begin.”

Some drivers received multiple fines in the mail before they realized they were committing an infraction because it can often take two to three weeks for the summons to arrive by mail, Ung added.

The council member suggested the DOT install larger and more conspicuous signage or paint the busway road red to alert motorists that through traffic isn’t allowed.

The roadbeds of other busways in the city, like Jamaica Avenue & Archer Avenue Busway shown above, have been painted red. (DOT via Twitter)

“I believe the DOT can take some fair and simple steps to alert motorists to these changes without resorting to costly fines,” Ung wrote.

The busway has stirred controversy among residents since its inception. A group of local business owners mounted an unsuccessful legal challenge to stop it from being installed, arguing that it would deter customers from coming to the busy shopping zone. Former Flushing Council Member Peter Koo also opposed its installation.

 

email the author: news@queenspost.com
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Op-ed: Congestion pricing would do much more harm than good for New Yorkers

Jun. 11, 2024 By Assemblymember David I. Weprin

Like many residents throughout the five boroughs and across the New York Metro Area, I was pleasantly surprised by Governor Kathy Hochul’s decision to “indefinitely pause” the implementation of Congestion Pricing. Rather than seeing this as a cynical calculation, as some have alleged, I see the Governor’s decision as a deeply pragmatic response to the crescendo of public concerns that I and many others have raised for years. As the countdown to the June 30 implementation date neared, everyday New Yorkers did what we do best: we spoke up for ourselves and said we won’t accept a bad deal! I applaud Governor Hochul for having the courage not just to listen to us but to take a tough stand against this misguided policy.